Tuesday L5520981

Pelicans


Had the opportunity to shoot a flock or two of pelicans as the local fisherman threw them the heads of the fish they’d caught.

Most of the images were shot at 1/1000th of a second, shutter priority, 200ISO. For most I had a polarising filter attached. If you like more details, leave a comment/question.

All were shot with the Leica D-LUX (Type 109) (aka Panasonic LX100).

The D-Lux does nice black & white in camera. In this image I've used the red filter option, which has darkened the sky very effectively.

A walk along the shore


Yamba, on the far Northern NSW coast, is a very pretty place. I took an hour or so and came back with a few nice images.

Macro isn't a really strong point of the D-Lux, but it's not bad, either. The control over the Aperture and the fast lens makes for nice bokeh and shallow depth of field.

Macro isn’t a really strong point of the D-Lux, but it’s not bad, either. The control over the Aperture and the fast lens makes for nice bokeh and shallow depth of field.

The pelicans around Yamba  aren't worried by people wielding cameras - at least not too much, otherwise I would never have made this image, which was shot from just a few metres away. This image is a tweaked JPEG - if Aperture supported the RAW files, I would have used that, but this looks OK.

The pelicans around Yamba aren’t worried by people wielding cameras – at least not too much, otherwise I would never have made this image, which was shot from just a few metres away.
This image is a tweaked JPEG – if Aperture supported the RAW files, I would have used that, but this looks OK.

The D-Lux does nice black & white in camera. In this image I've used the red filter option, which has darkened the sky very effectively.

The D-Lux does nice black & white in camera. In this image I’ve used the red filter option, which has darkened the sky very effectively.

A compact holiday


I have access to a huge range of incredible photographic tools – Canon Full Frame and Olympus m4/3 systems, video cameras, many lenses, flashguns, filters, tripods… but on holidays this Christmas all I’ve brought along is the Leica D-Lux (Type 109, aka Panasonic LX100).

I use the bigger equipment for work, and I enjoy my work, but this holiday is about the family. It’s about getting out on our 30 year old trailer boat, riding some bicycles, walking along the beach, swimming and surfing and drinking and eating too much.

The sort of things most Australians do at Christmas.

So I brought along the little Leica, a polarising filter and a tripod (which are the first two accessories I recommend to anyone taking up photography – before you buy a second lens, buy a tripod).

Anyway, I’ll publish a few images here and maybe I’ll even talk about how they were captured.

I got up early for this one.  The Type 109 has bracketing easy to get to in the drive menu - I set it to seven frames, 1 stop apart. It defaults to shooting at a fast frame rate, so a few seconds later all the images were captured. I used aperture priority - ISO 200 @ f/16. I wouldn't usually use such a small aperture, but I wanted the decking sharp, so I needed depth of field to run from about 50cm (under 2 feet) to infinity. The seven frames were combined in Photomatrix Pro, tweaked, and cropped to 16x9.

I got up early for this one.
The Type 109 has bracketing easy to get to in the drive menu – I set it to seven frames, 1 stop apart. It defaults to shooting at a fast frame rate, so a few seconds later all the images were captured.
I used aperture priority – ISO 200 @ f/16. I wouldn’t usually use such a small aperture, but I wanted the decking sharp, so I needed depth of field to run from about 50cm (under 2 feet) to infinity.
The seven frames were combined in Photomatrix Pro, tweaked, and cropped to 16×9.

Panoramic with the D-Lux


You access the panoramic feature of the Leica D-ux (Type 109) via the drive menu – it’s right up the end of the list. The Panasonic Lumix LX100 works the same way.

The camera fires off numerous frames and stitches them together for you. I haven’t really had a lot of time to analyse the results, but a quick look shows they look pretty good.

I was going to post a full-res version, but it’s over 7000 pixels wide. Here’s one which is 2000.

Lake Macquarie Pano

Stray images


I’m in Melbourne, Australia, on a business trip – no shooting. But I’ve brought the little Leica and thought I’d post anything interesting. Nothing here ‘professional’, just glorified snaps which show off the camera’s capabilities.

The globe

Nothing bright here…

Frangapani L5500022

Approaching storm L5500030

Using an in-camera filter to enhance a dull scene.

 

 

4K on the D-Lux


I bought my Leica on a Friday, so on Saturday I made a video – a very short, unremarkable video.
Except it tracks along, as though on a slider, stops when I’ve walked into the frame and wave, then starts sliding again.

http://vimeo.com/113185459

I sent it to a couple of filmmaker mates who’d both picked it – all the sliding is done in post. It would have been a nightmare to make such a shot in 1080, because I wouldn’t have been able to slide the camera. It was achieved because I could crop the 4K.

For the past three months I’ve been making Cycle Torque TV, a low-budget motorcycle TV show. Catch it at here.

The show has been successful enough that I think we will be starting production on series two soon, and the little Leica will have a staring role as the go-to camera for pieces to camera with a wide, mid-shot and close up in the same take with the same camera.

It can go on top of a lightweight tripod and stay stable. And the experiments we did In the studio today show with careful set-up of white balance and exposure, I think few viewers will ever be able to tell it apart from the 5D shots it will be combined with.

All that for less than the cost of a good slider.